Ask for the Ball


I was a terrible basketball player.

Coach Wallach saw potential - I and no one else could see it.

I made the high school team.

Over five years I learned to play and love the game.


I learned about leadership too.

Mostly leadership of self.

I'm open! Photo by Marisa Reda

As I got more and more confident with my knowledge and skills, I asked for the ball.


Asking for the basketball is, ironically, a non-verbal exercise.

Move, get in position, show/clap hands, and keep moving.

Then adjust and try again.


I aim to move to get open... constantly, so players with the ball get in the habit of seeing me being open. If I don't get the ball - it's on me.


And when I don't get the ball, that's part of the game and an opportunity to try again, differently. The more I am seen to be open, the higher the chances of getting the ball.


When I shy away... when I avoid taking a step, when I fear showing my true self for fear of being vulnerable and "open"... when I complain that no one is passing me the ball... this is when my living legacy stops.


Watching my son play handball, I saw those who got in there... were patient... got the ball and made the game happen! Confident, strong steps forward... it felt exhilarating to watch.


And I saw those who didn't.


If I am willing to be patient... to keep getting free... show my hands for the ball... soon those around me will learn to see me when I get free... and confident action will happen.


What about you?


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Sonia Di Maulo, M.A., C.R.P., founder of Harvest Performance, applies 20 years of experience to cultivate trust, inspire connection, and harvest results.


As a Global Leadership Innovator, she uses positive communication and positive education principles from her award-winning Ken Blanchard endorsed book, The Apple in the Orchard to impact people, places and communities.


She is a proud mom of two teenage sons, and enjoys travel and dark chocolate.

Connect with her, www.soniadimaulo.com.

© 2017 by Sonia Di Maulo & Alice Isac